Russian Essays On Shakespeare

Tolstoy on Shakespeare: A Critical Essay on Shakespeare3.53 · Rating details ·  81 Ratings  ·  16 Reviews

Count Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy (1828-1910) commonly referred to in English as Leo Tolstoy, was a Russian writer - novelist, essayist, dramatist and philosopher - as well as pacifist Christian anarchist and educational reformer. He was the most influential member of the aristocratic Tolstoy family. His first publications were three autobiographical novels, Childhood, BoyhooCount Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy (1828-1910) commonly referred to in English as Leo Tolstoy, was a Russian writer - novelist, essayist, dramatist and philosopher - as well as pacifist Christian anarchist and educational reformer. He was the most influential member of the aristocratic Tolstoy family. His first publications were three autobiographical novels, Childhood, Boyhood, and Youth (1852-1856). They tell of a rich landowner's son and his slow realization of the differences between him and his peasants. As a fiction writer Tolstoy is widely regarded as one of the greatest of all novelists, particularly noted for his masterpieces War and Peace (1869) and Anna Karenina (1877). In their scope, breadth and realistic depiction of 19th-century Russian life, the two books stand at the peak of realist fiction. As a moral philosopher Tolstoy was notable for his ideas on nonviolent resistance through works such as The Kingdom of God is Within You (1894). During his life, Tolstoy came to the conclusion that William Shakespeare is a bad dramatist and not a true artist at all. Tolstoy explained his views in a critical essay on Shakespeare written in 1903....more

Paperback, 110 pages

Published May 8th 2009 by Dodo Press (first published November 1906)

Early this May, when a troupe of British actors step off a plane in Moscow, a modest piece of history will have been made. It will be the first time Shakespeare’s Globe in London has brought a show to Russia — a pitstop on the theatre’s adventurous Globe to Globe tour, in which the company attempts to take Hamlet to every single country in the world between now and 2016. It will also mark the start of the first UK–Russia year of culture, in which Kazimir Malevich and cosmonauts will come to London while, courtesy of the Barbican’s Designing 007 exhibition, James Bond goes to Russia (travelling, for once, on official papers).

The Globe’s visit, like Bond’s, is a landmark. But as they stroll around Moscow in their two precious days there, the actors would do well to remember that their house playwright got there long in advance. He has, in fact, been in Russia for centuries, mingling with the locals and learning the language. These days, you could argue, he almost counts as a native.

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