Works Cited Page Vs Bibliography Template

 

Format of the MLA Works Cited Page in MLA 7

Quick facts:

  • The Works Cited list typically appears at the end of a paper.
  • Name the page “Works Cited.” While “Bibliography” and “Literature Cited” are sometimes used, Works Cited is often the most appropriate.
    • An Annotated Bibliography is different than a Works Cited list. An annotated bibliography includes brief summaries and evaluations of the sources. Check out our page on Annotated Bibliographies to learn more.
  • Make the Works Cited page the next consecutive page number. If the last page of your project is page 12, the Works Cited list will be page 13.

Format of the Paper:

  1. Use one-inch margins around the paper. Double-space the entire document.
  2. Place the title of the page (Works Cited) in the center of the page, an inch from the top.
  3. Create a double space between the title (Works Cited) and the first citation.
  4. Each citation should start on the left margin (one inch from the side of the paper).
  5. For longer citations, indent the second and any subsequent lines one half inch from the beginning of the citation. This is called a hanging citation.

Example of a hanging citation:

Kondō, Marie. The Life-changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese

             Art of Decluttering and Organizing. New York: Ten Speed,

             2014. Print.

 

Format of Citations:

  1. Place citations in alphabetical order by the author’s last name. If there are two works by the same author, alphabetize by the last name of the second author (if there is one). If there is only the single author, alphabetize by the title of the work.

Two or More Works by the Same Author

If there are two works by the same author, it is not necessary to type out their full name for each citation. Instead, type out the full name in the first citation only. For all subsequent citations, in place of the name, type three hyphens with a period at the end.

 

Example:

 

Sparks, Nicholas. The Notebook. New York: Warner, 1996. Print.

 

—. A Walk to Remember. New York, NY: Warner, 1999.
Print.

 

If the author is listed along with another author, type out the full name of each author, do not use the hyphens and periods.

 

Example:

 

Sparks, Nicholas. The Notebook. New York: Warner, 1996. Print.

 

—. A Walk to Remember. New York, NY: Warner, 1999.
              Print.

 

Sparks, Nicholas, and Micah Sparks. Three Weeks with My Brother.


              New York: Warner, 2004. Print.

 

Two or More Works by the Same Authors:

 

When there are two or more works by multiple authors, use hyphens and periods.

 

Example:

 

Rosenthal, Amy Krouse, and Tom Lichtenheld. Duck! Rabbit! San

             Francisco: Chronicle, 2009. Print.

—. Exclamation Mark.

             New York: Scholastic, 2013. Print.

 

Don’t forget, you can create your MLA citations quickly and easily on EasyBib.

For more information on creating your MLA Works Cited page, check out Writing Commons and Illinois Valley Community College’s website.

In Word bibliography features are available to make the process simpler. Also in Word works cited features are available. Learn about them here.

How to create a bibliography or works cited page in Word

If you need to write a research paper, chances are you'll also be required to include a bibliography. Or you might be asked to include a works cited page or a list of references. These are all just different names for the same thing: a list of sources—such as books, articles, or even websites—that you used to research and write your paper. A bibliography makes it easy for someone else to see where you found your information. A short bibliography might look something like this:

You could create a bibliography manually, but it would take a lot of work. And if you ever decide to add more sources or use a different reference style, you’ll have to update everything all over again. But if you take the time to input your sources into Word, it can create and update a bibliography automatically. This can save you a lot of time and help ensure your references are accurate and correct.

We’ll use Word 2013 to show you how to create a bibliography, but you can use the exact same method in Word 2010 or Word 2007.

Step 1: Choose a reference style

When you're creating a bibliography, you'll need to follow the guidelines of the required style guide. Different academic disciplines use their own styles guides, such as MLA, APA, and Chicago. Fortunately, Word comes with several built-in style guides; all you need to do is select the one you want to use, and Word will help you format your bibliography correctly.

To do this, click the References tab, then select the desired style in the Citations & Bibliography group.

You can use this same method to change the reference style at any time.

Step 2: Add citations and sources

Whenever you use information from one of your sources, you'll need to give credit—or cite them. This is known as making a citation. You'll include citations whenever you use information from a source or when you quote a source directly.

To add a citation, select the desired location for the citation in your document, click the Insert Citation command on the References tab, and select Add New Source.

A dialog box will appear. Enter the requested information for the source—like the author name, title, and publication details—then click OK.

The citation will appear in the document, and the source will be saved. You can quickly add another citation for the source by clicking Insert Citation and selecting the source from the drop-down menu.

Step 3: Insert the bibliography

Time for the easy part! Once you've added all of your sources, you can create your bibliography in just a few clicks! Just select the Bibliography command, then choose the desired style.

The bibliography will appear at the end of your document. Your sources will already be formatted to match the selected style guide. You should still double-check each of your sources against your style guide to make sure they're correct. If you need a quick reference for MLA, APA, or Chicago formatting, we recommend the Purdue Online Writing Lab.

If you add more sources to your document, you can easily update your bibliography—just click it and select Update Citations and Bibliography.

No matter how many sources you include in your document, Word's built-in tools make it easy to create and organize a bibliography. If you want further guidance with the process, check out this tutorial from Microsoft on how to Create a Bibliography.

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